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Science Board & Advisors

Governing Board Members

Kevin Kelly - Governing Board Chair

Terry Erwin

Gustavo Fonseca

David Hillis

Russell Mittermeier

Sir Ghillian Prance

Ryan Phelan

Jorge Soberon

Peter Warshall

Science Board Members

David Hillis - Science Board Chair

Daniel Brooks

Deborah Brosnan

Keith Crandall

Michael J Donoghue

Scott Edwards

Terry Erwin

Brian L. Fisher

Gustavo Fonseca

James Hanken

Patrick Kociolek

Gerardo Lamas

Peter Raven

Christian Samper

Peter Warshall

Edward O. Wilson

ALL Species Advisors

Allen Allison

Laura Arriaga

Jesse Ausubel

Kemp Battle

Stan Blum

Lynn Bohs

Brian Boom

Jeff Boore

Ian Bowles

Stewart Brand

Sergey Brin

Rick Brusca

Gonzalo Castro

Douglas Causey

Joaquin Cifuentes

Daniel M. Cohen

Woody Cotterill

Joel Cracraft

Ian Cresswell

Jim Croft

Patricia Davila-Aranda

Richard Dawkins

Michael F. Dolan

Jim Edwards

Neal Evenhuis

Brian Farrell

Roberta Faul-Zeitler

Adrian Forsyth

Rodrigo Gamez

Scott Gardner

Fernando Gast

Terry Gosliner

Fred Grassle

Ana-Luisa Guzman

Winnie Hallwachs

Paul Hawken

David Hawksworth

Héctor M. Hernández

Da-Wei Huang

Michael E. Irwin

Daniel Janzen

Victoria Kamsler

Shel Kaphan

David Kavanaugh

Michael A. Keller

Bryce Kendrick

Beatrice Khayota

Nick King

Thomas E. Lacher

Su See Lee

Michael Lerner

Jorge Llorente

Thomas E. Lovejoy

Christopher Lyal

David Maddison

Eugene Marais

Robert (Bob) Martin

Stafford Matthews

John McCosker

Ron McGinley

Scott Miller

Russell Mittermeier

Tom Moritz

Pete Myers

Nana Naisbitt

Edna Naranjo-Garcia

Piotr Naskrecki

Kenneth Nealson

Larry Page

A. Townsend Peterson

John Peterson

John Pickering

Naomi Pierce

Jason Pontin

Richard Pyle

Jim Reichman

Miguel Reynal

Lawrence A (Larry) Riggs

Richard Rockefeller

Fredrik Ronquist

Michael Ruggiero

Jeffrey Sachs

José Sarukhán

Setijati D. Sastrapradja

Mark Schaefer

Michael Schauff

Evert I. Schlinger

Gideon Smith

Bruce Stein

Steven L. Stephenson

Simon Stuart

Dominique Trudeau

Diana H. Wall

Richard Weise

Judy West

David Western

Terry Yates

David Yeates

Allen Allison
Allen Allison is currently the Vice President of Science at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu Hawaii. Allen also serves as a Zoology Advisor to GEF-Indonesia Biodivhersity Project and is also a Research Associate to the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonia. His recent publications include biological surveys of Hawaii and conserving biological diversity in Papua New Guinea.

Laura Arriaga
Laura Arriaga is a plant ecologist currently heading the Direction of Analysis and Planning at CONABIO (Mexican National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity).
At CONABIO her work involves several programs related to biodiversity systematization, analysis, monitoring and spatial modeling. Her research has been focused in community and landscape ecology, mainly in the study of regeneration processes associated with disturbed forest communities and in the analysis of spatial and temporal patterns of biodiversity.

Jesse Ausubel
Jesse H. Ausubel is Program Director, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and Director of the Program for the Human Environment at The Rockefeller University, New York City
Mr. Ausubel's work examines the long-term interactions of technology and the environment. He was one of the main organizers of the first UN World Climate Conference (Geneva, 1979), which substantially elevated the global warming issue on scientific and political agendas. For the US National Academy of Sciences he drafted Toward an International Geosphere-Biosphere Program: A Study of Global Change, the 1983 report originating the Global Change Program. In the late 1980s Mr. Ausubel helped originate the field of industrial ecology, the study of the network of all industrial processes as they may interact with each other and live off each other. He is now deeply involved in a new international observational program to assess and explain the diversity, distribution, and abundance of life in the oceans, the Census of Marine Life.

Kemp Battle
Kemp is a Principal at Tucker Capital Corp., an investment banking firm which provides strategic advisory services to branded media companies and Non-Profits.
Battle has served since 1994 on the Executive Committees of Torstar's education division (including Tom Snyder Productions, Delta Education and Frank Schaffer Publications). He currently chairs the Publishing Advisory Committee for The Birds of North America, a 10 year research project aimed at cataloging every species of bird in North America.

Stan Blum
Since 1990, Stan has been working full-time in biodiversity and natural history collections informatics.
The two most important themes in his work have been: 1) designing integrated information systems for natural history museums (i.e. systems that support a wide variety of taxonomic disciplines, collection management practices, and uses of biodiversity information); and 2) developing data standards and software architectures that will enable data to be integrated across heterogeneous collection databases.

Brian Boom
Brian is currently Associate Director for Research at the Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC) at Columbia University, New York City. Brian is a systematic and economic botanist with a geographic focus on the Neotropics. Before his current assignment, he held positions as a curator and Vice President for Science at The New York Botanical Garden and as President and CEO of the ALL Species Foundation. He is a past President of the Natural Science Collections Alliance and the current President of the Society for Economic Botany.

Ian Bowles
Ian Bowles is a Senior Research Fellow in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and a Senior Advisor to the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. Previously, he served as Senior Director of Global Environmental Affairs at the National Security Council and as Associate Director of the White House Council on Environmental Quality from 1999-2001. Prior to that, he was Vice President for Conservation Policy at Conservation International.

Sergey Brin
Sergey Brin, a native of Moscow, received a bachelor of science degree with honors in mathematics and computer science from the University of Maryland at College Park. He is currently on leave from the Ph.D. program in computer science at Stanford University, where he received his master's degree. Sergey, 28, is a recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. It was at Stanford he met Larry Page and worked on the project that became Google. Together they founded Google, Inc. in 1998.

Daniel Brooks - Professor at University of Toronto, Canada
Inventory Coordinator for Eukaryotic Parasites of Vertebrates in the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica.
Brooks specializes in the systematics and evolution of parasitic helminths of vertebrates. Among his more than 250 publications are several texts integrating systematics, ecology and behavior (Phylogeny, Ecology and Behavior: A Research Program in Comparative Biology; Parascript: Parasites and the Language of Evolution; The Nature of Diversity: An Evolutionary Voyage of Discovery).

Stewart Brand
Co-founder and Managing Director of Global Business Network (GBN), President of The Long Now Foundation

Brand is probably most well known for founding, editing, and publishing the Whole Earth Catalog (1968-85), which received a National Book Award for the 1972 issue. In 1984, he founded The WELL (Whole Earth 'Lectronic Link), a computer teleconference system for the San Francisco Bay Area. It now has 11,000 active users worldwide and is considered a bellwether of the genre. Brand has been a member of the Board of Trustees of the Santa Fe Institute, an interdisciplinary center studying the sciences of complexity, since 01989. He founded and runs the GBN Book Club.
He received the Golden Gadfly Lifetime Achievement Award from the Media Alliance, San Francisco in the 01989. He was a founding member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an organization which supports civil rights and responsibilities in electronic media, and is an acting advisor to Ecotrust, Portland-based preservers of temperate rain forest from Alaska to San Francisco. Brand is the author of many pioneering books including The Clock Of The Long Now in 1999, How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They're Built in 1994, The Media Lab: Inventing the Future at MIT in 1987, and Two Cybernetic Frontiers on Gregory Bateson and cutting-edge computer science in 1974. It had the first use of the term "personal computer" in print and was the first book to report on computer hackers.

Deborah Brosnan - President of Sustainable Ecosystems Institute (SEI)
A marine biologist active at the interface of science and policy, Brosnan believes that scientists must play a leadership role in solving the world's environmental crises. She founded SEI to play an active national and international role in science and policy and to serve as a conduit for scientists to engage in real world issues. The ocean realm is Brosnan's passion, and she often dives under active volcanoes to learn more about their impact on corals and fisheries. Her research focuses on marine conservation, marine reserves, and on disturbance in marine systems from rocky shores to Caribbean coral reefs. Author of several scientific and popular articles, she is currently working on a book on the interaction of marine science and conservation

Rick Brusca
Dr. Richard (Rick) Brusca is Director of Conservation and Research at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. He also holds research positions at the University of Arizona (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Department) and CIAD (Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo), Mexico.

Gonzalo Castro
Dr. Gonzalo Castro is the Team Leader for Biodiversity with the Environment Department of the World Bank. Previously, he was the acting Vice-President and Director of the Latin American and Caribbean Program of the World Wildlife Fund in Washington. Prior to that, he was founder and first CEO of Wetlands for the Americas, an international NGO (today Wetlands International).

Douglas Causey
Douglas Causey is Senior Vertebrate Biologist of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, and heads the Ornithology Department.
His research interests are focused on understanding the historical dynamics of co-evolutionary biodiversity, environmental security and public health, and the evolution of complex systems. He has published over 125 scholarly articles, three technical books, and several non-technical articles on science. He has specialized in seabird biology and is known for field based studies of host-parasite systems. Primarily an ornithologist, he remains puzzled why the rest of the world doesn't share his enthusiasm for cormorants.

Joaquin Cifuentes
Dr. Joaquin Cifuentes is Curator of the FCME Herbarium at the School of Sciences of the National University (UNAM) Mexico and Head of the Comparative Biology Department. He has been teaching Botany and Mycoly courses during 27 years. He has published 36 papers on taxonomy and sistematics of macromycetes and has tutored 18 bachelor students, 6 master students and 3 Ph. D. students. He has produced a 20 000 specimens collection of fungi from Central and Southern Mexico.
Currently He is inventoring macrofungi from Reserva de la Biosfera de la Mariposa Monarca (Michoacan. Mexico) and Reserva de la Biosfera de Calakmul (Campeche, Mexico). He is co-researcher in the regional project inventoring ectomycorrizal fungi of Belize.

Daniel M. Cohen
Ph.D. Stanford, 1958; research interests: ichthyology, deep sea biology; retired from National Marine Fisheries Service and Natural History Museum L.A. County.
Research has been concerned mainly with the systematics of fishes, particularly the argentinoids (deepsea smelts), the ophidiiforms (mainly deep sea fishes with no common name), and the gadiforms (cods and relatives).

Woody Cotterill
Woody Cotterill is Scientific Officer at the Africa Biodiversity Foundation.

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Joel Cracraft
Ornithologist; Curator-in-Charge, Department of Ornithology, American Museum of Natural History.
Joel's research interests are systematic biology, biological diversification, and biogeography. Much of his current research on the higher level systematics of birds, and the radiation of the large Australian endemic avifauna, involves the use of DNA sequencing. He has written or edited books on phylogenetic systematics (1979, 1980), phylogenetic analysis of molecular data (1991), and the biodiversity crisis (2000), in addition to over 150 scientific papers.

Keith Crandall
Keith Crandall is the Thomas L. Martin Professor of Biology in the Departments of Integrative Biology and Microbiology & Molecular Biology at Brigham Young University. He also is Curator of Crustacea at the university's Monte L. Bean Life Sciences Museum. Crandall studies the molecular systematics and conservation biology of a variety of organisms, but tries to focus on crustacea (especially freshwater crayfish, freshwater crabs and barnacles). His lab also focuses on the development and testing of phylogenetic methods for estimating the tree of life. He is also the principle author of the Crayfish Homepage: http://crayfish.byu.edu.

Ian Cresswell Ian Cresswell is the Assistant Secretary of the Trade and Fisheries Assessment Branch of Australia's Department of Environment and Heritage, managing Commonwealth environmental issues concerning trade in Australian native wildlife and environmental assessment of Australian fisheries. He has also managed a range of other marine issues within Environment Australia including domestic and international marine species and marine protected areas. Ian has 20 years experience as a professional scientist working nationally and internationally. He previously held the position of Director of the Australian Biological Resources Study (ABRS) tasked with disseminating information on all Australian species. He has been actively involved in the development of the Global Taxonomy Initiative (GTI) under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and has been the Australian focal point for the GTI for several years. He has also played an active part in the formulation of the Global Biodiversity Information facility (GBIF) and has chaired a national taskforce within Australia to look at ways of implementing GBIF in Australia. His personal research interests are in mangrove and coastal marshland ecology.

Jim Croft
Web guru; Director, Botanic Information at the Australian National Botanic Gardens.
His interest in taxonomy and distribution of ferns and their allies is focused on Australia, New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, and the SW Pacific regions. This includes extensive field collections, especially in Papua New Guinea, the compilation of regional checklists, keys and descriptions of pteridophyte taxa and making this information available on the Internet.

Richard Dawkins
Richard Dawkins was educated at Oxford University and has taught zoology at the universities of California and Oxford. He is the Charles Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University. His books about evolution and science include The Selfish Gene, The Extended Phenotype, The Blind Watchmaker, River Out of Eden, Climbing Mount Improbable, and most recently, Unweaving the Rainbow.

Michael F. Dolan
Mike is a protistologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst specializing in the hindgut symbionts of termites; he is co-author with Lynn Margulis and Karlene Schwartz of Diversity of Life.
He is currently working with the American Museum of Natural History to inventory and catalog the Harold Kirby collection of termite symbionts, the largest such collection in the world, and create a database of specimens, as well as a comprehensive global list of all wood-eating termites and their symbionts.

Jim Edwards
Jim is the Executive Secretary for the Global Biodiversity Information Facility, a new international coordinating body devoted to making scientific biodiversity data freely and openly available to all via the Internet. Prior to 2002, Jim was at the US National Science Foundation, most recently as Deputy Assistant Director for Biological Sciences. His research interests are in the functional morphology and systematics of amphibians and fishes, and in biodiversity informatics.

Terry Erwin
Research Entomologist, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution Fellow of the California Academy of Sciences and the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard

Early in his career, Erwin solved the intractable taxonomy of the California Bombardier Beetles which led to long term study of Neotropical beetles and a lifetime study on the biodiversity of Neotropical forests. With the publication of a small paper in 1981 on the beetle fauna of a species of Panamanian tree, Erwin created a cottage industry in canopy studies and in trying to estimate the number of species on the planet. He had hypothesized The1981 paper hypothesized that there were perhaps as many as 30,000,000 species rather than the 1.4 million described at the time - an order of magnitude difference. This paper generated a lot of activity in the conservation business because many people realized that landscape conversion was having a more significant impact on biodiversity than previously thought. Erwin continues his studies of biodiversity in the western Amazon Basin, at present in Ecuador, and does taxonomic studies on carabid beetles.

 

Neal Evenhuis
Neal L. Evenhuis is Chairman of Natural Sciences at Bishop Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii. He has published on the biosystematics, nomenclature, history, and bibliography flies (Diptera), with a special interest in the arid-loving Mythicomyiidae (micro-bee flies).
In addition to his research on Diptera, Evenhuis is the current president of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, is Editor for Scholarly Publications for Bishop Museum Press, and maintains the Hawaii Biological Survey website.

Roberta Faul-Zeitler
Roberta Faul-Zeitler is currently Executive Director, Natural Science Collections Alliance.

Brian D. Farrell
Brian D. Farrell is a full Professor of Biology in the Department of Organismal and Evolutionary Biology, and is Curator in Entomology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, at Harvard University. Brian is known for his (NSF and USDA supported) phylogenetic studies of plant-feeding beetles. At the MCZ, Brian initiated the Insect Type Specimen ImageDatabase
, and has recently begun planning a Caribbean Biodiversity Initiative, aimed at putting images of type specimens and literature for this biodiversity hotspot on the web.
Brian also leads his entomology course field trip to the Dominican Republic (where he will spend next year on sabbatical) for insect collecting and data/image capture for an online insect field guide and biodiversity map in collaboration with Dominican scientists.

Brian L. Fisher - Assistant Curator of Entomology at the California Academy of Sciences
An ant systematist who specializes in the large-scale discovery, description, and naming of African and Malagasy ants, Fisher also applies maps of species diversity patterns to land management and conservation priority setting. His inventory work in Africa and Madagascar demonstrates the feasibility and challenges of conducting global inventories. He also has particular interest in the evolution of the early lineages of ants and is dedicated to instructing the next generation of ant systematists.

Adrian Forsyth
Adrian Forsyth, tropical ecologist, is Senior Biodiversity Scientist at the W Alton Jones Foundation and president of the Amazon Conservation Association.

Gustavo B. Fonseca
Senior Vice President for Science at Conservation International and Executive Director of the Center for Applied Biodiversity Science. Fonseca is a founding member of Brazil's Biodiversity Trust Fund, a member of the Steering Committee of IUCN's Species Survival Committee, and also a member of the Government of Brazil's Presidential Committee on the Agenda 21. His scientific experience ranges from mammalogy and primatology to interdisciplinary aspects of biodiversity conservation. He has published over 80 scholarly papers in addition to dozens of popular articles. In 2001, Fonseca was awarded the Golden Ark Prize from the Dutch Government for his accomplishment in the science of biodiversity conservation.

 

Adrian Forsyth
Adrian Forsyth, tropical ecologist, is Senior Biodiversity Scientist at the W Alton Jones Foundation and president of the Amazon Conservation Association.

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Rodrigo Gamez
Rodrigo is a founding member, Director and President of the Board of Costa Rica's National Biodiversity Institute (INBio).
Dr. Gámez has been also associated with numerous national and international initiatives in biodiversity conservation. As a Costa Rican Government delegate, he was active in the formulation of the U.N. Convention for Biological Diversity and served on a number of UNEP biodiversity-related advisory committees.

Scott Gardner

Scott L. Gardner is Professor, Curator, and Director of the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology at the University of Nebraska- Lincoln. His studies of parasites and mammals have taken him to the field in the U.S. including Alaska, northern and western Mexico, South Africa, Mongolia and Bolivia. Primarily interested the biodiversity of cestodes and their mammalian hosts, he also studies the ubiquitous though largely unstudied group, the Nemata (the nematodes).
Scott is leading the online parasite database project, Worm-Web, where the collection data will soon have geo-reference information available for all specimens in the database, including those of Bolivian parasite specimens that are connected to their host vouchers in museums worldwide. Scott is a consultant to the Journal of Parasitology, on the editorial board of Comparative Parasitology, and has courtesy appointments in the Department of Mammalogy of the American Museum of Natural History, and the Museum of Southwestern Biology at the University of New Mexico. He works closely with colleagues at the national museums in Beltsville, MD, Paris, and Mexico.

Fernando Gast
Fernando Gast is General Director of the Instituto Humboldt in Colombia.

Terry Gosliner
Terry Gosliner, Provost, California Academy of Sciences. Nudibranch systematist.
His research has focused on documenting diversity of nudibranchs from tropical ecosystems and has shown species richness to be much higher than previously thought in the western Pacific. He has found more that 600 species of opisthobranchs from a single lagoon in Papua New Guinea, where about 60% of the species found are undescribed.

Fred Grassle
Fred Grassle is Chair of the Steering Committee for the Census of Marine Life and Director of the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University.
He is best known for his research indicating a very high diversity of species in the deep sea. He was also a pioneer in the exploration of deep-sea hydrothermal vents and is presently working on development of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS).

Ana-Luisa Guzmán
Since 1992, Ana-Luisa Guzmán has been Projects Evaluation Director at CONABIO (Mexican National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity). Formerly, she worked at the National Institute of Ecology, the Mexican Academy of Sciences, CONACYT (Science and Technology National Council) and the Science Communication Center at UNAM (National University of Mexico). She has been a lecturer in graduate programs at UNAM for the past 20 years. Her professional activities have focused on science communication and the promotion, coordination and administration of scientific and academic projects.

Winnie Hallwachs
Winnie Hallwachs is currently Professor, Biology at the University of Pennsylvania.

James Hanken
James Hanken is Director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University, where he also holds appointments as Curator in Herpetology and Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology.
His research focuses on the taxonomy, systematics, and evolutionary biology of neotropical salamanders, as well as amphibian development and evolution. Current projects include the discovery and formal description of large numbers of unnamed species of salamanders from Mexico and Central America.

Paul Hawken
Paul is a writer whose work focuses on the relationship between living and human systems (The Ecology of Commerce, and Natural Capitalism).

David Hillis - Board Chair
Director of the School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas

David Hillis' primary interests are in biodiversity, molecular evolution, and the phylogeny of life with his research interests spanning much of biology, from development of statistical and computational methods for analyzing DNA sequences, to molecular studies of viral epidemiology, to studies of the diversity and phylogeny of life, to the origin and behavior of unisexual organisms. He has published over 130 scholarly articles and two technical books, and has served as Editor or Associate Editor of a dozen scientific journals.

 

Da-Wei Huang
Da-Wei Huang is a Professor at the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IZCAS). He is majoring in biosystematics of parasitic wasps, including phylogenetics, morphology, and behavior and biocontrol.
He is also the director of IZCAS, and has also served as Executive Vice Chairman, Editorial Committee of Fauna Sinica, Vice President, Entomological Society of China, Deputy Director of the Expert Committee of Biosystematists, CAS, Standing committee member, Asia-Pacific Conference of Entomology (APCE), and member of the GTI (Global Taxonomy Initiative) Coordination Mechanism.
He has published ninety scientific papers and three monographs on systematics.

Michael E. Irwin
Michael E. Irwin is a Professor at the Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois.
Mr. Irwin's research has focused on plant virus epidemiology; aphid migration and movement; interchange of biota between managed and natural systems; international crop protection and soybean pest management; and biosystematics of Therevidae and phylogeny of the Asiloidea His efforts are now focused on Madagascar and New Caledonia, and his program is attempting to become involved with biodiversity questions in the more xeric zones of Spain, Bolivia, and Cuba.

Daniel Janzen Daniel Janzen is currently Professor, Biology at the University of Pennsylvania (Guanacaste Conservation Area)

Victoria Kamsler
Victoria Kamsler was educated at Oxford University and has taught ethics and political philosophy at Harvard, Wellesley, Bryn Mawr, Queens College CUNY, Princeton, and the University of Georgia, where she is a member of the Philosophy Department and the Environmental Ethics Certificate Program. She is currently working on the development of an Environmental Justice program at UGA. Her research interests include a project on Environmental Incentives, developing insights from the work of William McDonough.

Shel Kaphan
Shel Kaphan was co-founder of Amazon.com. He did a lot of the original software design and programming there, and was a VP for 2.5 years and then CTO for 2.5 years, until he left in 1999. Before that, Shel had 20 years of experience in systems and software development, and before that, he once worked for a summer for Stewart Brand at the Whole Earth Catalog.
Shel has lots of other interests, among them looking for and lending support to projects, such as the All Species initiative.

David Kavanaugh
David Kavanaugh, Senior Curator of Entomology, California Academy of Sciences.
His research interests focus on the systematics, phylogeny, biogeography, and natural history of carabid beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae). In addition to several phylogenetic systematic studies, he is currently involved in carabid inventory projects in China (Yunnan), Costa Rica, Madagascar, Papua New Guinea, and several areas in western North America.

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Michael A. Keller
At Stanford, Michael A. Keller is the Ida M. Green University Librarian, Director of Academic Information Resources, Publisher of HighWire Press, and Publisher of the Stanford University Press. These titles touch on his major professional preoccupations: commitment to support of research, teaching and learning; effective deployment of information technology hand-in-hand with materials; active involvement in the evolution and growth of scholarly communication. He may be best known at present for his distinctively entrepreneurial style of librarianship. As University Librarian, he endeavors to champion deep collecting of traditional library materials (especially of manuscript and archival materials) concurrent with full engagement in emerging information technologies.

Beatrice Khayota
Beatrice Khayota is currently the Botanist-In-Charge of the East African Herbarium, National Museums of Kenya. She holds a Ph.D in Botany, specialising in Plant Taxonomy. Her research focus is on systematics and conservation of the Orchidaceae. Beatrice is involved in CBD and CITES, both at the National and global level and is currently the chair of the IUCN-SSC Orchid Specialist Group, Afro-Madagascar region.

Kevin Kelly
Editor-at-Large, Wired Magazine
In 1993, Kelly helped launch Wired Magazine, a magazine that reports on the culture of technology. Under his leadership as its Executive Editor, Wired won the National Magazine Award for General Excellence (the industry's equivalent of an Oscar) in 1994 and 1997. Prior to Wired, Kelly was editor and publisher of the Whole Earth Review, a small-circulation magazine reporting on unorthodox technical and cultural news. He is the author of Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Economic and Social Systems, published by Addison Wesley (1994). This wide-ranging book is about how machines, the economy, and all large human-made inventions are becoming biological. Fortune magazine called it "essential reading for all executives." His book New Rules for the New Economy published in 1998 by Viking in the US and by 4th Estate in the UK, was a bestseller in the US and has been translated into German, Spanish, Italian, Greek, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Dutch, Swedish, and Estonian.
Kelly's writing has appeared in many national and international publications such as the New York Times, The Economist, Time, Harpers, Science, GQ, and Esquire. Instead of going to college, he went to Asia as a photographer and has just published Asia Grace, a photographic essay of images collected during that trip. His photographs have appeared in LIFE and other national magazines. He has no college or university degrees.

 

Bryce Kendrick
Bryce Kendrick is a mould expert (Hyphomycetes) and an ecologically oriented general mycologist who is also interested in everything from birds to coral reefs. He taught and researched at the University of Waterloo, Ontario for 30 years, and has over 300 publications, including several books. His textbook, The Fifth Kingdom, has been adopted by many Universities, and he has built (and constantly updates) a CD-ROM covering all aspects of mycology.
He received the distinguished mycologist award of the Mycological Society of America in 1995, was made a Centenary Fellow of the British Mycological Society in 1996 and was awarded the Lawson Medal of the Canadian Botanical Association in 2001. He now enjoys life on the edge (of the ocean) in southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

Nick King
Dr. Nicholas King is an ecologist by training, with a PhD in Management of Technology and a professional background in environmental management and sustainable development, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. Since 1999, he has been the Director of BioNET-INTERNATIONAL, the Global Network for Taxonomy, a not-for-profit, international NGO dedicated to taxonomic capacity building with membership of over 120 countries world-wide.
BioNET's modus operandi is to catalyse the establishment of sub-regional, co-operative networks between countries and institutions to pool, share and optimise taxonomic resources in the developing world in South-South partnerships, and build new capacity via North-South collaboration. Capacity building activities focus on access to information and information and communication tools, training, rehabilitation and establishment of new reference materials including collections and literature, and development of new tools and technologies.
The Global Network structure is designed to facilitate and optimise partnerships between all interest stakeholders to better enable developing countries to fulfil their obligations under the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Patrick Kociolek
Executive Director, Hanna Chair and Associate Curator Invertebrate Zoology and Geology, at the California Academy of Sciences

Thomas E. Lacher, Jr.
Thomas E. Lacher, Jr., is the Senior Director for the Tropical Ecology, Assessment and Monitoring (TEAM) Initiative in the Center for Applied Biodiversity Science at Conservation International. He also holds the Caesar Kleberg Chair in Wildlife Ecology in the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&M University and has held positions at the University of Brasilia, Brazil; Western Washington University; and Clemson University, where he was the director of the research consortium of the Archbold Tropical Research Center.
His research has focused on the ecology and behavior of mammals, the applications of GIS methods to wildlife conservation, the effects of environmental contaminants on wildlife populations, and the integration of ecological and economic principles in conservation. The TEAM Initiative is establishing a network of tropical field stations that are implementing a set of standardized protocols for the monitoirng of biodiversity. He has been working in the tropics for 25 years, primarily in Dominica, Costa Rica, Panama, and Brazil.

 

Gerardo Lamas
Professor, at the Faculty of Biology, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru, and Curator, Department of Entomology, Museo Nacional de Historia Natural, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru.
His research is focused on systematics, biogeography and evolution of butterflies (Lepidoptera), primarily of the Neotropics.

Su See Lee
Mycologist studying fungal pathogens with the Forest Research Institute Malaysia.
She is a recognised authority on diseases of tropical forest plantation trees and her research on mycorrhizas has established her as one of the very few dipterocarp mycorrhizal researchers and also one of the few mycologists in Southeast Asia with a good knowledge of tropical macrofungi.

Michael Lerner
Michael Lerner is president and founder of Commonweal, a health and environmental research institute in Bolinas, California. His central interest is the restoration and preservation of the web of life. He is the co-founder of the Commonweal Cancer Help Program, a residential support program for cancer patients. He is the author of Choices in Healing: Integrating the Best of Conventional and Complementary Cancer Therapies [MIT Press].
He also serves as president of the Smith Farm Center for the Healing Arts in Washington, D.C., and of the Jenifer Altman Foundation, the Mitchell Kapor Foundation, and the Consultative Group on Biodiversity. He is the co-founder of the Health and Environmental Funders Network. He received a MacArthur Prize Fellowship in 1983 for contributions to public health.

Jorge Llorente
Jorge Llorente is Professor of Taxonomy and Biogeographyin Faculty of Sciences at UNAM (1975-2002). His research interests are in theory, history and methodology in Taxonomy & biogeography and Pieridae (Insecta; Lepidoptera) in neotropical regions.
Publications include more than 120 papers, 40 books, and work published in more than 65 chapters in books.

Thomas E. Lovejoy
Thomas E. Lovejoy currently works for the United Nations Foundation and serves as Chief Biodiversity Advisor for the World Bank.
Thomas Lovejoy is generally credited with having brought the tropical forest problem to the fore as a public issue. He was the first person to use the term biological diversity (in 1980) and made the first projection of global extinction rates in the Global 2000 Report to the President that same year.

Christopher Lyal
Chris Lyal is a specialist on the taxonomy and systematics of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) and lice (Phthiraptera) at the Natural History Museum in London, UK, where he leads the Beetle Diversity and Evolution Programme. His major research areas are weevil bioinformatics, higher classification, and seed predation, and he is involved in projects in Europe, South-East Asia and Central America. He has also been, since January 2001, Acting Programme Officee for the Global Taxonomy Initiative of the Convention on Biological Diversity.
This initiative has been developed to address the 'taxonomic impediment' - the scarcity of taxonomic expertise, staff, institutions and information that hinders the implementation of the CBD.

David Maddison
Department of Entomology, University of Arizona; Tree of Life Web Developer.
David's research focuses on three main areas: (1) phylogeny and evolution of beetles, (2) phylogenetic inference methods and the development of software tools, (3) coordination and development of the Tree of Life project.

Eugene Marais
Eugene Marais is the head of the Natural History Division and Curator of Entomology at the National Museum of Namibia. Starting off as a beetle systematist in 1986, which still remains his first love, he has evolved along with the changing circumstances in Africa and Namibia into an entomological general practitioner to advise and support all sectors of society.
His research interests are wide ranging, from subterranean to canopy communities, from palaeoenvironments to the composition of extant invertebrate communities, from economic entomology and sustainable development to wilderness conservation.

Rober (Bob) Martin Robert (Bob) Martin, Vice President Academic Affairs and Curator of Biological Anthropology, The Field Museum

John McCosker
John McCosker, Senior Scientist at the California Academy of Sciences, is a systematic ichthyologist who specializes in eastern Pacific and coral reef communities, with particular interest in the evolution of marine eels.
Although trained as an evolutionary biologist, his research activities have subsequently broadened to include such diversetopics as the fishes of the Galapagos Islands, the symbiotic behavior of bioluminescent fishes, the biology of the coelacanth, the behavior of venomous sea snakes, the predatory behavior of the white shark, and dispersed and renewable energy sources as alternatives to national vulnerability and war. More recently his research has concerned the husbandry of endangered salmon and the cause of their decline within the California rivers and coastal environment.

Stafford Matthews
Stafford Matthews is a technology transactions and commercial partner in the San Francisco office of the international law firm of Morrison & Foerster LLP. Mr. Matthews received his J.D. degree from the University of Michigan Law School, where he was a member and editor of the Michigan Law Review, and has an A.B. in Rhetoric, summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Departmental Honors, from the University of California, Berkeley. Stafford specializes in the licensing and transfers of patents and other intellectual property rights and technologies in domestic and international markets; product and software distribution systems; commercial antitrust issues; structuring and negotiating strategic alliances and other complex business relationships; and related fields. He represents a number of prominent charitable organizations concerned with international human rights and with scientific and technological advancement, and is on the board of directors of the Global Witness Foundation, Long Bets Foundation, and the American Associates of the Royal National Theatre.

Ron McGinley
Ron is assistant chief at the Illinois Natural History Survey.
McGinley's significant publications include a 1994 book, The Bee Genera of North and Central America (coauthored with Charles Michener), which has become a major reference text for bee specialists, botanists and pollination ecologists. Associated with his administrative interests he published a 1993 paper (Where's the Management in Collection Management?) that introduced a new approach to collection management ("collection profiling") that has been adopted directly or in modified form at over 23 museums around the world, including the British Museum, Berlin, Paris and the Australian National Collection.

Scott Miller
Scott E. Miller, Acting Chairman, Department of Systematic Biology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., has a Ph.D. from Harvard University and has published over 117 research publications in systematics, biogeography, and ecology. Previously, he led the Natural Science Department and Hawaii Biological Survey at Bishop Museum (Hawaii) and the Biodiversity and Conservation Programme at International Centre of Insect Ecology and Physiology (Kenya).
He is committed to applying biodiversity information from museum collections and systematics research to sustainable development, and has participated in major reviews of biodiversity related to conservation planning, including co-editing the "Papua New Guinea Biological Diversity Country Study."

Russell Mittermeier
President, Conservation International, Washingon, D.C.
Prior to this, he served as Vice-President for Science at World Wildlife Fund (1987-89) and as Director of that organization's programs for Brazil and the Guianas (1985-89), Madagascar (1985-89), Species Conservation (1986-89) and Primates (1979-89). He has served as Chairman of the Primate Specialist Group of the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Species Survival Commission (IUCN/SSC) since 1977, as SSC's Vice-Chairman for International Programs since 1985, and as Chairman of the World Bank's Task Force on Biological Diversity in 1988 and 1989.

Tom Moritz
Tom Moritz, Boeschenstein Director of Library Services, American Museum of Natural History

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Nana Naisbitt
Nana Naisbitt, Smithsonian Research Collaborator and fulltime writer, specializes in interpreting technology and science for the non-technical and non-scientific audience. She is currently writing a book on conservation for the Smithsonian Press and is partnering with California Academy of Sciences to produce public forums dedicated to framing the scientific, ethical, and philosophical issues of emerging genetic technologies.
In May 2000, Naisbitt moderated the first of these forums, entitled "Human Genome Human Being," in Beijing, China, in cooperation with Peking University and the Link Foundation. In February of 2002, Naisbitt organized and moderated the second such forum convened by the California Academy of Sciences through her organization, The Global Forum. She coauthored High Tech High Touch (Broadway Books, 1999) which was published in eighteen countries in twelve languages. In June of 2000, Naisbitt wrote the piece "Will low tech replace high tech?" for TIME magazine¹s five part series, Visions 21. In 1999, Fast Company selected her as one of 21 "thought leaders offering compelling ideas for the 21st century."

Edna Naranjo-Garcia
Edna Naranjo-Garcia is curator of the Coleccion Nacional de Moluscos (National Collection of Mollusks), Instituto de Biologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Her main research is on systematics and biogeography of terrestrial mollusks, she also adventures into the freshwater realm.

Piotr Naskrecki
Piotr Naskrecki is Director of the Invertebrate Diversity Initiative at CABS, Conservation International (residing at the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University.)
His research focuses on the behavior, systematics, and evolutionary biology of orthopteroid insects, as well as host affiliations of flower mites. Current projects include studies on the evolution of sound production in katydids, a monograph of Costa Rican katydids, and the phylogeny of Neotropical mites of the genus Proctolaelaps.

Kenneth Nealson
Ken is an environmental microbiologist heading up the Center for Life Detection at JPL/Caltech. He is developing methods for life detection in extreme environments on Earth, and perhaps in situ on other planetary bodies in the solar system. Current projects include the investigation of microbial populations in extreme environments ( Antarctica, hot deserts, permafrost (Arctic and Antarctic), subglacial environments, deep methane hydrate-clathrate environments, alkaline lakes, and sub-permafrost water lenses), and the development of non-Earth centric methods for life detection.

Larry Page
Larry Page is Adjunct Curator of Fishes at the Florida Museum of Natural History, and Principal Scientist Emeritus at the Illinois Natural History Survey. His research interests include the systematics, behavior and ecology of freshwater fishes, and he is co-author of the Peterson Field Guide to Freshwater Fishes of North America and author of the Handbook of Darters. He is Principal Investigator on an inventory of the catfishes of the world
, one of the four Planetary Biodiversity Inventories awarded by the U.S. National Science Foundation in 2003. He also serves as an Associate Editor for Zootaxa, an electronic journal dedicated to the taxonomy of animals

A. Townsend Peterson
Curator of Ornithology in the University of Kansas Natural History Museum, co-directs the assembly of The Species Analyst, an international cooperative effort to link biodiversity information sources via the Internet.
His research has focused on genetic and geographic aspects of speciation, particularly in Mexican birds. Most recently, he has participated in the development of tools for predicting geographic distributions of species from incomplete point data.

John Peterson
John Peterson is former Director of the W. Alton Jones Foundation, a private philanthropy that supported work to maintain biodiversity, protect the earth's climate, develop and implement economic policies that support environmental protection, protect children's health from environmental threats, and build constituencies committed to environmental protection. He currently is a Senior Advisor to the United Nations Foundation and a Senior Fellow at Commonweal.

John Pickering
Biologist and computer expert developing ways to involve students,teachers, and the general public in natural history research, education, and conservation.
My life's goal is to document and understand the diversity of life in this hemisphere -- an impossible task without help from many, many people. Hence, my involvement with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, the Organization for Tropical Studies,
Discover Life in America, Georgia Forest Watch, and now the All Species Foundation.

Naomi Pierce
Naomi E. Pierce is Hessel Professor of Biology and Curator of Lepidoptera, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University. Pierce's research interests include insect/plant interactions, behavioral ecology, and life history evolution. In particular, she has focused on the biology of the Lycaenidae (Lepidoptera) as a model system to investigate species interactions, chemical communication, mutualism, biodiversity, conservation and the evolution of complex life history traits.

Jason Pontin
Jason Pontin is Editor of Red Herring, a bi-weekly magazine about the business of technology. Red Herring attempts to make sense of "the business of technology" by providing its readers with a forward look at innovations and market trends. It cuts through the hype surrounding the established players, and it analyzes the important trends behind the technology. As Editor, Pontin is responsible for guiding all aspects of the magazine toward this vision while also contributing regular monthly columns. Pontin was formerly senior editor at InfoWorld magazine, where he penned the popular Robert X. Cringely column and covered operating systems.
Educated at Oxford, he also previously wrote for Financial Times and Euromoney. He was voted the 27th most influential business journalist by "The Journal of Financial Reporters" in February of 2001 and the 10th "Top Influencer by Media" in business magazines by ADWEEK's "Technology Marketing" in June of 2001.

Sir Ghillian Prance
MacBride Professor at the National Tropical Botanical Garden in Hawaii Scientific Director of the Eden Project- Cornwall, England

Prance has authored seventeen books and published over 400 scientific and general papers in taxonomy, ethnobotany, economic botany, conservation and ecology. He holds fourteen honorary doctorates and in 1993 received the International COSMOS Prize and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. He was knighted in July 1995 and received the Victoria Medal of Honour in 1999. In 2000 he was made a Commander of the Order of the Southern Cross by the President of Brazil.

Ryan Phelan
Entrepreneur
Ryan was one of the co-founders of the All Species Foundation and was instrumental in its initial start-up phase in 2001 as a Board Member. In 2002 Phelan served as CEO and laid the groundwork for ALL's strategic initiatives in 2003.
Ms. Phelan is a social entrepreneur and businesswoman who has been influential in diverse fields from education and health care to software development and the equestrian industry. She excels at starting non-profit organizations as well as for-profit businesses, building their staff, board, and partnerships, turning concept into reality, resulting in quality service and products.
Her most recent example is the Internet business she founded in 1995, Direct Medical Knowledge (DMK), which was sold to WebMD in 1999. DMK was an extensive consumer health web site highly regarded for its unique content depth and innovative search interface. DMK developed proprietary software that enabled users to drill down through the most current medical literature and retrieved personalized health and medical information. As CEO of DMK, Ms. Phelan forged alliances with major medical institutions, national health care plans, publishers, and consumer groups. In 1999 Direct Medical Knowledge was acquired by WebMD, a leader in the Internet health information industry, to be the backbone of WebMD's consumer health site, http://my.webmd.com/.

 

Richard Pyle
Richard Pyle has worked in the Natural Sciences Department of Bishop Museum in Honolulu since 1986. The results of his pioneering use of advanced mixed-gas diving technology to explore deep (50-150m) coral-reef habitat has revealed unexpectedly rich biodiversity and high levels of depth-endemism, suggesting larger numbers of undiscovered species within this realm than previously believed.
Richard also has a keen interest in taxonomic data management, and designs and develops desktop and web-based computer database applications for this purpose. He has nearly completed is PhD dissertation in fish systematics at the Department of Zoology, University of Hawaii, under the guidance of Dr. John E. Randall.

Peter H. Raven
Director of the Missouri Botanical Garden and Engelmann Professor of Botany at Washington University
In addition to his directorship at Missouri Botanical, he is a member of the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology, and President-Elect of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. As one of the world's leading botanists, Raven has dedicated nearly three decades to conservation and biodiversity as Director of the Missouri Botanical Garden, where he has cultivated a world-class institution of horticultural display, education, and research. Described by Time magazine as a "Hero for the Planet," Raven champions research around the world to preserve endangered plants and is a leading advocate for conservation and a sustainable environment.

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Jim Reichman
O. J. (Jim) Reichman is Director of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
Reichman¹s research focuses on the influence of the spatial patterns of animals disturbances on the restoration of plant communities and natural landscapes. A second area of research involves an analysis of long term food storage strategies by animals that cache food during periods when it is unavailable of costly to secure.

Miguel Reynal
Miguel Reynal of la La Barra de Maldonado, Uruguay, is executive president of Foundation ECOS, a non profit educational foundation focused on sustainable development and environmental management for decision makers in South America. He was founding president of Foundation Vida Silvestre Argentina, the foremost Argentine environmental NGO and a WWF Associate Organization, where he serves on the executive council and board. Mr. Reynal was general representative of Bank of Indo-Suez for Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Bolivia, he also served on the board of Seguros del Interior, S.A., an insurance company, for many years. CEO of Austral Airlines, South Americas second-largest private airline, and of Sol Jet Brazil and Sol Jet Argentina. He has spoken at numerous conferences, published several articles, and received awards for his environmental and conservation work, including the United Nations Global 500 Environment Award. A member of the National Council of the World Wildlife Fund US Mr. Reynal received a B.A. in economics from Harvard University.

Lawrence A. (Larry) Riggs Lawrence A. Riggs is President and CEO of Biosphere Genetics, Inc. (BGI), a research and consulting firm dedicated to bringing information, tools, and training for genetic analysis to under-served applications in species inventory, conservation, natural resource management, and a number of commercial niche markets.

Fredrik Ronquist
Fredrik Ronquist is currently Professor in Systematic Zoology at Uppsala University, Sweden.

Michael Ruggiero
Michael Ruggiero is currently the Director of the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), an automated reference of scientific and common names for biological organisms and their classification. He is involved in numerous international programs related to biodiversity monitoring and informatics.

Jeffrey Sachs
Jeffery Sachs, Director, Earth Institute, Columbia University

Cristian Samper
Deputy Director and Staff Scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.
Founder and Director General of the Alexander von Humboldt Institute, the national biodiversity research institute of Colombia. He played a key role in biodiversity conservation in Colombia, pushing scientific research in Colombia's conservation agenda.

José Sarukhán
José Sarukhán graduated from National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in 1964 with a biologist degree. He obtained a Master's degree in Agricultural Botany from the Postgraduate College (Chapingo, Mexico City) in 1968 and in 1972 he received his Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of Wales, Great Britain.
He was elected by the Board of Governors to be director of the Biology Institute of the UNAM for two consecutive periods, and he held this post from 1979 until 1987. In February 1987, he was appointed Vice Chancellor for Science at the UNAM, and in December 1988, he was elected by the Board of Governors as Rector of this university for the period 1989-1993 and reappointed for the same post for the period 1993-1997. He is Senior Researcher in the Institute of Ecology since 1988.

Mark Schaefer
Mark Schaefer is currently CEO & President of NatureServe.

Michael Schauff
Michael E. Schauff is Research Leader and head of the Systematic Entomology Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, USDA at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland. He has published on the systematics of parasitics wasps important to biological control and the importance of systematics to biologically-based pest managment. In addition to his research on Hymenoptera, he is a Curator at the National Museum of Natural History, an Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland, and Chair of the Executive Committee of the Major Systematic Entomology Facilities Group (MSEF). Organizational

Evert I. Schlinger
Professor Emeritus, Entomological Sciences, University of California, Berkeley.
Mr. Schlinger has worked over the past 50 years publishing articles and books primarily on Diptera, but also on predaceous mites, spiders, aphid parasitoids, as well as biological controls. I have spent 7 years of my professional life in foreign countries throughout the world, doing foreign explorations for beneficial insects and biodiversity studies with numerous countries and their National Parks.

Gideon Smith
Gideon Smith is Director of Research and Scientific Services at the National Botanical Institute, stationed in Pretoria, and also Professor of Botany at the University of Pretoria.
Prior to that, he was Deputy Director (1993-95) at the NBI. He has also lectured in the Plant Sciences Department at the Potchefstroom University for CHE (1986-92) where he was promoted to senior lecturer, and worked as a pharmaceutical chemist at the SA Bureau of Standards (1981-85). He currently holds the John Acocks Chair in the Department of Botany at the University of Pretoria.

Jorge Soberon
Executive Secretary of Mexico's National Commission on Biodiversity - CONABIO
At CONABIO, Sorberon is in charge of programs related to inventorying Mexican biodiversity and computerization of collections in Mexico and abroad. His published research includes papers on mathematical ecology, insect ecology, conservation biology and biodiversity informatics, as well as many science popularization publications and technical reports to different bodies. For three years he was a member of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Panel to the Global Environment Fund of the World Bank. He has represented Mexico in the Conference of the Parties for the Convention Biological Diversity, CITES, NABIN, IABIN and GBIF.

 

Bruce A. Stein
Bruce Stein is Vice President for Programs for NatureServe, a non-profit organization that is a leading provider of scientific information about rare and endangered species and threatened ecosystems. A plant taxonomist by training, Dr. Stein was previously a senior scientist with The Nature Conservancy where he focused on improving the availability of biodiversity information for conservation and land use decisions.
He was lead author of the recent book Precious Heritage (Oxford Univ. Press), which offers a comprehensive view of the status of biodiversity in the United States, and currently has responsibility for the NatureServe Explorer website, an "Online Encyclopedia of Life" offering conservation information on more than 50,000 North American species and ecological communities.

Simon Stuart
Simon Stuart holds a doctorate from the University of Cambridge, and carried out field research on forest avifaunas in Tanzania and Cameroon. For 15 years he has worked for IUCN - The World Conservation Union, where he has served as Head of the Programme of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC), and as Acting Director General. He has played a major role in applying science to conservation policy, for example in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CITES). He is one of the people responsible for developing the new criteria for including taxa on the offical IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
Since 2001, he has been seconded to the Center for Applied Biodiversity Science (CABS) at Conservation International, where he is heading up a new unit on biodiversity assessment shared jointly between CABS and SSC. The first project of this new unit is the Global Amphibian Assessment, which is documenting the conservation status, habitat requirements, geographic distributions, threats and conservation measures for all 5,000+ of the world's amphibian species.

Dominique Trudeau
Research Scientist at the University of California-Berkeley in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology.
Mr. Trudeau's research focuses on insect-virus interactions and cover a diversity of topics ranging from evolutionary biology to insect physiology. The aim of his research at Berkeley is to elucidate mechanisms of insect resistance to viral infection and viral host range factors.

Diana Harrison Wall
Dr. Diana Wall is Professor and Director of the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, an international ecosystem research center at Colorado State University. Her research addresses the importance of soil biodiversity for ecosystems and society. Specifically, she investigates how soil biodiversity contributes to healthy, productive soils and the consequences of human activities on soil sustainability. Dr. Wall studies the diverse invertebrate group, soil nematodes, in ecosystems of varying land uses in agriculture & natural areas, in Africa, Antarctica, Colorado and elsewhere. She chairs the DIVERSITAS-International Biodiversity Observation Year-2001- 2002, a program to demonstrate the importance of biodiversity to the future of our planet, and the SCOPE (Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment)-Committee on Soil and Sediment Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning. She has served as President of the Ecological Society of America, the American Institute of Biological Sciences, the Intersociety Consortium for Plant Protection, and the Society of Nematologists. Dr. Wall is a Fellow of the Society of Nematologists and the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Peter Warshall
Editor-At-Large, Whole Earth Magazine
In addition to his role as Editor-At-Large with Whole Earth, he is the founder of Peter Warshall and Associates a consulting firm specializing in complex economic/ecological systems, especially those that impact water resources and wildlife populations. Clients have included Volvo, Senco, Clorox, Trygg Hansa, SAS Airlines, and other companies; United Nations High Commission for Refugees, and US AID; the Tohono O'odham nation and Apache Survival Coalition; municipal, state and federal governments (eleven in African nations) and non-governmental organizations.
With an academic background in biology and anthropology, Warshall works globally with highly diverse people and ecosystems. His expertise includes natural history, natural resource management (especially watersheds, wastewater, and wildlife), conservation biology, biodiversity assessments, environmental impact analysis, and conflict resolution and consensus building between divergent economic and cultural special interest groups. He has worked in Africa for various organizations and in Arizona for several Native American tribes and as an adjunct research scientist with the Office of Arid Lands Studies (University of Arizona). Warshall has a special interest in producers of commodities (loggers, farmers, ranchers, fishermen, miners) as they are the link between the materials flows of our economy and the natural world.

 

Richard Weise
Richard Weise, President, Explorer's Club

Judy West
Judy is a plant systematist with CSIRO Plant Industry and Director of the Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research and Australian National Herbarium. The CPBR is a collaborative venture between CSIRO Plant Industry and the Australian National Botanic Gardens. She has an adjunct Professor appointment at Australian National University. Her scientific interests are in systematics, phylogeny and biogeography (particularly of Portulacaceae (pigweeds), Caryophyllaceae and the hopbushes of Sapindaceae), as well as bioinformatics and conservation biology. Judy has a particular interest in the application and adoption of modern information technologies to deliver the results of taxonomic research and natural history collections data to a broader user community in easy-to-use, accessible interactive formats.

David Western
David Western is a conservationist with the Wildlife Conservation Society and Chairman, African Conservation Centre.
Western was formerly director of Wildlife Conservation Society's International Programs, director of Kenya Wildlife Service, Chairman of the African Elephant and Rhino Specialist Group, Chairman of the Wildlife Clubs of Kenya and founder president of the Ecotourism Society. His publications include Conservation for the Twenty-First Century, Natural Connections: Perspectives in Community-based Conservation and In the Dust of Kilimanjaro.

Edward O. Wilson
University Research Professor and Honorary Curator of Entomology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard.
Perhaps more than any other scientist of our century, Edward O. Wilson has scrutinized animals in their natural settings, tweezed out the dynamics of their social organization, their relationship with their environments, and their behavior not only for what it tells us about the animals themselves, but for what it can tell us about human nature and our own behavior. He has brought the fascinating and sometimes surprising results of these studies to general readers through a remarkable collection of books, including the recent bestseller, The Future of Life and among others, The Diversity of Life, The Ants, On Human Nature, and Sociobiology. The grace and precision with which he writes of seemingly complex topics has earned him two Pulitzer prizes and the admiration of scientists and general readers around the world.

Terry Yates
Terry Yates is the Director of the Division of Environmental Biology at the National Science Foundation, a Professor of Biology and Pathology and Curator of Mammals and Biological Materials, Museum of Southwestern Biology at the University of New Mexico.
Dr. Yates has published 87 papers in refereed outlets. He has finished 14 Ph.D., 6 Masters and 5 Postdoctoral students. He has been the principal investigator or co-principal investigator on over $20,000,000 in outside support. He currently has research support from CDC, NIH, NSF, IHS and USGS spanning the fields of Biology, Engineering, and Medicine.

David Yeates
Dr. David Yeates main research interests are in the systematics and evolution of Diptera (flies). He is currently with CSIRO Entomology in Canberra and Coordinates the Biodiversity and Informatics research project. Much of the systematic research in CSIRO Entomology relies on the Australian National Insect Collection (ANIC), the world's largest collection of Australian insects.

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